Salkantay Tours


     The Salkantay trek starts at Challacancha which is almost 2:30 hours walking to Soray from here we will go to visit the Huamntay lake which is an amazin lake full of turquoise color, on the second days the walk goes steeply uphill for half an hour then comes to a series of zigzags (Siete Culebras is the local name of this strech). At the top of the seventh switchback the terrain levels out under Salkantay ́s lateral moraine, and drops gently down tothe small laguna Soyrococha. The pass you see above is, alas, a false one; the main pass is a little further on, but the view of Salkantay looming above you more than compensates for the effort. The real pass at 4,750m is reached after 3-4 hours from the moraine, and is marked by a pile of stones , “well know as Apacheta bythe locals”, which grows daily as each traveller adds his pebble to thank the APUS for a safe trip.
   
 Then the trail descends to the left –hand side of the valley, becoming indistinct in swampy areas. And then comes a place named Huayrajmachay “eye of the wind”, from here we will have a great chance to see the beautiful Pyramid-shape of Humantay behind as you drop below the tree line, know as LA CEJA DE SELVA (“Eyebrown of the Jungle”), and walk through groves of bamboo with many orchids and other flowers and lots of hummingbirds, spectacular waterfalls, a small hot spring at Collpapampa the right place to lock out for the parakeets that abound in this area as well.and the we go to to camp at a coffee plantation at Lucmabamba so we will learn about the proccess of the coffee from here we can take a local transport to go to The Santa Tersa Natural Hot Spring where we will enjoy the hot springs which is 45 minutes from this town and on the 4th day we will walk through Llactapa Original Inca Trail so from the top we will see machupichu and waynapichu mountains and then the last day will see finally the inkan city of machupicchu.
     
There is nothing like the satisfaction of approaching Machu Picchu on one’s own two feet, which is why the classic Inca Trail hike has become so popular in recent years. The time when a traveler could roll into Cusco and set up an Inca Trail trek for the following day—or week, or month—has long since passed, though. To limit damage to the trail, the Peruvian government now limits access to 500 persons per day, porters included. Permits for the peak summer season sell out months in advance Fortunately, the Inca were master road builders who blazed trails all throughout the Andes, and many of these are alternate routes to Machu Picchu.
 
We offer you alternatives, which require no permits.The classic Inca Trail is famed for the diversity of its topography and ecosystems; the Salcantay Route’s smorgasbord is even more impressive.
The 20,500-feet-high Mount Salkantay was one of the holiest  or sacred peaks, in the Inca religious pantheon. It’s still revered today in traditional Andean religion. This mule-assisted hike cuts through the beautiful Mollepata Valley and traverses past Salcantay at an altitude above 15,000 feet. From those chilly heights, the trail descends into subtropical cloud forest, where it meets up with an ancient Inca highway (part of the original Capac Ñan network that connected the far ends of the empire) that leads to the recently rediscovered ruins of Llactapata. From there, one can gaze a few miles across the valley to take in a rare sidelong view of the full Machu Picchu complex. A downhill walk ends at the small train station, where a frequent shuttle runs along the Urubamba River to Aguas Calientes, the town at the base of Machu Picchu.